Google engineer Daniel Ratner, riding the Google Street View Trike in Mountain View, CA, on March 17, 2011. Ratner is the inventor of the trike, a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.

The Google Street View Trike

The Street View feature in Google Maps that provides photographic imagery of city streets has been very popular since its introduction to the public. However, images have been limited to where its cars with mounted cameras could go. But now, Google engineer Daniel Ratner has developed a 250-pound tricycle outfitted with cameras.

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Since, the Street View Trike has been around the world traveling pedestrian walkways, park trails, Legoland, Stonehenge, the Palace of Versailles in France, and even some of the narrowest streets of Italy. The collection of pictures has recently been released on their website.

The Street View trike is a three-wheeled pedicab mounted with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are stored on a hard drive so they can be later processed by a computer and used by the Google Maps application. Motion sensors on the trike are used to track its position, speed and direction. GPS units for positioning and laser range scanners are used to determine the position and distances within the Street View imagery. According to Google, specially trained, super fit Google employees and contractors ride the trikes.

A cutting-edge face blurring technology obscures license plates and the faces of bystanders. In an effort to offer even more privacy, easy-to-use reporting tools allow people to ask for images of their car or themselves to be further concealed in Street View.
Once in Google Maps, a visitor can visually explore and navigate the location through the street-level photographs, moving up and down paths, or looking around in 360 degree panoramas.

The trike was created during the 20 percent time allotted to Google’s employees to work on personal projects.

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Oakland resident Tina Fernandez on March 22, 2011, looks at a 360 degree street view imagery of the Palazzo Reale di Caserta in Italy taken by the Google Street View Trike. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
Title:
The Google Street View Trike
Date:
March 22, 2011
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A 360 degree street view imagery of the Palazzo Reale di Caserta in Italy taken by the Google Street View Trike and viewed through Google maps webiste. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
Title:
The Google Street View Trike
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March 18, 2011
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A 360 degree street view imagery of  Dublin Botanical Gardens in Ireland taken by the Google Street View Trike and viewed through Google maps webiste. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
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The Google Street View Trike
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March 18, 2011
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A 360 degree street view imagery of the Lake Cunningham Park in San Jose, CA, taken by the Google Street View Trike and viewed through Google maps webiste. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
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The Google Street View Trike
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March 18, 2011
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A 360 degree street view imagery of the ruins of Pompeii in Italy taken by the Google Street View Trike and viewed through Google maps webiste. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
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The Google Street View Trike
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March 18, 2011
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A 360 degree street view imagery of Via Diacceto in San Gimignano, Italy, taken by the Google Street View Trike and viewed through Google maps webiste. The trike is a three-wheeled pedicab with a 360 degree multiple camera system mounted on a 7-foot pole that records photographic images automatically. The photographs are later processed and used by the Google Maps application.  The trike can go where the regular Google Street View Car cannot, like park trails, walkways and some of very narrow streets in Europe.
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The Google Street View Trike
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March 18, 2011
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